Building the fake UCS Imperial Star Destroyer

Written in late 2019 during back-log review of Lego interest

The very first set out of my “dark age” wasn’t even a real Lego set! I had researched and collected a “wanted list” of complex sets, mostly comprised of modular buildings and a few Star Wars sets (sure, who wouldn’t want to build the Death Star?). I had done research and known Lepin was a bad, bad brand since they essentially steal Lego designs and re-sell them as their own. Off-brand bricks are fine; copying designs and assembly instructions page by page is definitely not. Still, when I saw a Craigslist ad for a 3000-piece star destroyer for $50, I perked up. Though it was only $270 when it was released in 2002, used sets routinely go for $700 minimum online. I knew I was taking a risk (and hurting my self pride), but I got the thing for $40.

Essentially the experiment was to see how bad these Lepin bricks were and also just build something huge and get rid of it as quickly as I could. Surprisingly, most of the bricks were pretty decent for being off-brand. The instructions were nicely spiral-bound, though the 1:1 images were laughably NOT full-size (more like 80-90% sized), so essentially useless. Plates and magnets all bonded together just the way they were supposed to. The only really bad bricks were the half-pins which were used all along the length of the ship to hold the greebling (new term I learned during my deep dive into Jangbricks reviews!) in place. Most had little to no clutch power, so the details kept falling off.

This thing was surprisingly huge! But as I had some “real” lego sets to start building, I wanted it out of the house ASAP. Actually ended up making $20 on it, and the buyer wanted it “destroyed into oblivion”. H & I also enjoyed taking it apart piece by piece into a deceptively small box for its size. This thing was surprisingly huge! But as I had some “real” lego sets to start building, I wanted it out of the house ASAP. Actually ended up making $20 on it, and the buyer wanted it “destroyed into oblivion”. H & I also enjoyed taking it apart piece by piece into a deceptively small yet heavy box.

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